Zman Metsuyan!

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Every afternoon, we have Zman Metsuyan, when we learn about Israel. Today during Zman Metsuyan, the chanichimot (campers) learned about art, literature, and culture in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv. The goal was to give the chanichimot a better understanding of each city, and to prompt them to think about their preconceived notions regarding each city.

The chanichimot were able to choose to go to two of five discussions about various topics. These were the different options:

  • For the first option, the chanichimot listened to some music! They heard a song by the popular Israeli band Hadag Nahash that compared Jerusalem and Tel Aviv. Then, they listened to Yerushalayim Shel Zahav, a song about the desire to be in and the love for Jerusalem. They compared Yerushalayim Shel Zahav with a song called Yerushalayim Shel Barzel, which was written in protest of the 1967 war.
  • Other chanichimot read an essay about metaphors for Jerusalem and Tel Aviv in Israeli literature. They learned about how Jerusalem is often portrayed as rigid and closed off, while Tel Aviv is seen as more open.
  • Another option was reading a short story by Israeli author Etgar Keret, who wrote about modern day life in Tel Aviv.
  • For the next option, chanichimot read and discussed a story called “Swimming Contest” by Benjamin Trammuz, which tells the story of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict pre-1940 through the eyes of two young boys living in Tel Aviv/Jaffa.
  • The last option focused on the arts. The chanichimot looked at and compared biblical, classical Bezalel art with the more modern, abstract art coming out of Tel Aviv.

Here’s what a few chanichimot had to say about today’s Zman Metsuyan:

“I really liked that we got to choose which chugim we went to” -Mollie Block

“It was really interesting to read the stories and see how Jewish culture and ideology affects the way things are worded” -Danya Levy

“It was fascinating to see the different styles of arts. There was a great painting of the sea in Tel Aviv.” -Nathan Maya

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